WHAT TO DO ABOUT AN ALGAE PROBLEM

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WHAT TO DO ABOUT AN ALGAE PROBLEM

STOCK ISRAELI AND KOI FOR ALGAE CONTROL
Algae is or possibly will become a problem in the future in most ponds and lakes. It is for this reason that we recommend when stocking a new pond or lake to start with the fish and snails which will control algae.
If algae is already present we recommend that you stock enough algae eaters to control or eliminate your problem. There is no set amount to stock, it almost has to be done on an experimental basis according to how bad your problem is. There are a number of algae eaters offered in our catalog. The Israeli algae eaters and Japanese Koi are super fish for eating algae, the channel catfish is next in line, white suckers, fathead minnows, crayfish and all the snail family all feed on algae, and do an excellent job of controlling or eliminating algae.


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STOCKING FINGERLING FISH WHERE POND IS STOCKED WITH LARGE FISH

All animals, fowl, fish, etc., have a way to communicate with their species. We have experimented electronically, with fish. We find that each species make a different high frequency sound. Take for instance, Bass fingerlings, you get in a boat, and toss 5 or 6 of them every 20 feet, or if you have no boat, walk as far as you can in the water, and scatter sparingly around the pond, they will immediately dart for cover, with no sound. If you dump a hundred of them in one spot, they immediately start chattering, communicating with each other. In a crowd they feel safe. The feeding instinct of predator fish are programmed to that sound, the sound the small fish make when they are in danger. Bass will swim 200 feet to that sound, and Pike will appear on the scene in minutes, and then a Smorgasbord takes place. It is imperative, that you scatter your fish. If you use a motor boat, churn the water well, to disorinate the large fish, then scatter the fingerlings. For new ponds, you need not take any precaution, it is wise to stock our #6 Complete Farm Pond Stocking, and you will have the right amount of Predator and Forage Fish, for proper growth.


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